A 20 year trek in AI systems


This is a personal story about our real-world experience, which contains little resemblance to most of what is written about entrepreneurism and technology commercialization. While our journey has been longer than most, scientific commercialization (aka deep tech) typically requires two decades or more from theory to market. Read More

Why it has always been, and will always be — the network of entities


Physics won this debate before anyone had a vision that a computer network might someday exist, but biology played an essential role on the team. The reason of course is that all living things, including humans and our organizations, are unique in the universe—for our purposes anyway—until that identical parallel universe is discovered. Even perfectly… Read More

White board video presentation on Kyield Enterprise


http://youtu.be/X9bkUI7Gg8A

Kyield founder Mark Montgomery provides a 14 minute white board presentation on Kyield Enterprise and the Kyield Enterprise Pilot

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Converting the enterprise to an adaptive neural network


Those tracking business and financial news may have observed that a little bit of knowledge in the corner office about enterprise architecture, software, and data can cause great harm, including for the occupant, often resulting in a moving van parked under the corner suite of corporate headquarters shortly after headlines on their latest preventable crisis. Exploitation of ignorance in the board room surrounding enterprise computing has become mastered by some, and is therefore among the greatest challenges for emerging technology that have the capacity for significant improvement. I spend more time and energy on dispelling myths than I would prefer necessary, but so be it. The issues surrounding neural networks requires total emersion for extended duration. Many organizations lack the luxury of time, so let’s get on with it.
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Strategic IT Alignment in 2012: Leverage Semantics and Avoid the Caretaker


A very interesting development occurred on the way to the neural network economy: The interests of the software vendor and the customer diverged, circled back and then collided, leaving many executives stunned and confused.

The business model in the early years of software was relatively simple. Whether an individual or enterprise, if the customer didn’t adopt the proprietary standard that provided interoperability, the customer was left behind and couldn’t compete. This was a no brainer—we all adopted. By winning the proprietary standard in any given software segment, market leaders were able to deliver amazing improvements in productivity at relatively low cost while maintaining some of the highest profit margins in the history of business. This model worked remarkably well for a generation, but as is often the case technology evolved more rapidly than business models and incumbent cultures could adapt, so incumbents relied on lock-in tactics to protect the corporation, profit, jobs, and in some cases perhaps national trade……. Read More