Complex dynamics at the confluence of human and artificial intelligence


While it may be an interesting question whether the seasons are changing in artificial intelligence (AI), or to what extent the entertainment industry is herding pop culture, it may not have much to do with future reality. Given recent attention AI has received and the unique potential for misunderstanding, I thought a brief story from the trenches in the Land of Enchantment might shed some light. Read More

Why it has always been, and will always be — the network of entities


Physics won this debate before anyone had a vision that a computer network might someday exist, but biology played an essential role on the team. The reason of course is that all living things, including humans and our organizations, are unique in the universe—for our purposes anyway—until that identical parallel universe is discovered. Even perfectly… Read More

Legacy of the Tōhoku earthquake: Moral imperative to prevent a future Fukushima crisis


An article in the New York Times reminds us once again that without a carefully crafted and highly disciplined governance architecture in place, perceived misalignment of personal interests between individuals and organizations across cultural ecosystems can lead to catastrophic decisions………While not unexpected by those who study crises, rather yet another case where brave individuals raised red flags only to be shouted down by the crowd, the article does provide instructive granularity that should guide senior executives, directors, and policy makers in planning organizational models and enterprise systems. (click to continue to article) Read More

Book Review: What’s Holding You Back? — By Robert J. Herbold


While I rarely seem to have time for book reviews, the timing, content, and match to current needs of Bob Herbold’s new book is even more rare, so I wanted to share some thoughts while fresh. I read the book while on annual vacation in the San Juan Mountains with my wife at the end of September…….

In case after case, he shows us how lack of accountability, fear of negative impact on careers, refusing to take decisive bold action meeting actual needs, and poor cultures for innovation have led to failure in our hyper competitive global economy. We know what works and what doesn’t, the truth is just that what works is quite often very difficult and uncomfortable, not unlike team competition on the football field or climbing mountains. Read More

Key patent issued


My key patent for Kyield was issued today by the USPTO as scheduled earlier this month.

Title: Modular system for optimizing knowledge yield in the digital workplace

Abstract: A networked computer system, architecture, and method are provided for optimizing human and intellectual capital in the digital workplace environment.
To view our press release go here

To view the actual patent go here

I will post an article when time allows on the importance of this technology and IP, and perhaps one on the experience with the patent system. Thanks, MM Read More

Too Big to Fail or Too Primitive to Succeed?


Given the systemic nature and scale of the financial crisis, and in consideration of the poor ongoing economic conditions, it’s clear that the industry, political process, and regulators have all fallen short of achieving the individual mission of each, particularly in consideration of current technological capabilities.

For the past several months financial institutions have been trying to convince regulators that they should not be labeled a Systemically Important Financial Institution (SIFI). The process of implementing the 2010 Dodd-Frank law in the U.S. has resulted in spin offs in an attempt to avoid increased U.S. regulation, while the new global rules for multi-national banks on top of Basel III, including surcharges and increased capital ratios, is resulting in a comprehensive rethink of the fundamental assumptions surrounding the global banking model. Read More

Data Integrity: The Cornerstone for BI in the Decision Process


Structural integrity in organizations, increasingly reflected by data in computer networking, has never been more important. The decision dimension is expanding exponentially due to data volume, global interconnectedness, and increased complexity, thus requiring much richer context, well-engineered structure, far more automation, and increasingly sophisticated techniques. Read More

Thoughts on the Santa Fe Institute


A topic of considerable discussion, debate, and thought for a great many of us long before a series of ever larger crises, the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) chose the theme of complexity in regulation for their annual meeting, which just concluded. I was fortunate enough to attend last year’s 25th anniversary meeting at SFI, but this year I was only able to view the final full day via webcast, which was excellent. Prior to sharing my thoughts on the important topic of simplifying regulation in a future post, which will be covered more extensively in my book in progress, I want to focus a bit on SFI.

The official SFI about page can be found here, although having written many of these descriptions myself; I’ve yet to write or read one that captures the essence of the organization, people, or contributions, so please allow the liberty of a few additional lines in first person.

I have been following SFI regularly for 15 years, and since moving to Santa Fe nearly two years ago have had many interactions. SFI essentially pioneered complexity as a discipline, but is also a proponent of what I now refer to in my own work as a mega disciplinary approach to truth seeking, without which frankly many researchers and their cultures can become blinded.

One of several strengths of SFI is their ability to draw from a very broad universe of scholars, each of whom is a leading expert in a specific discipline, but also shares an interest in both complexity theory—which affects everything else, as well as the need to work across disciplines in order to learn from each.

The intimate size and environment of SFI is I believe why so many leading scholars contribute and engage. After living in Santa Fe, visiting the campus and attending multiple events, with a great many exchanges with larger institutions, I can certainly understand the appeal for permanent faculty, visiting scholars, post docs, and business network members. Read More

How can information technology improve health care?


I recall first asking this question in leadership forums in our online network in 1997, hoping that a Nobel laureate or Turing Award winner might have a quick answer. A few weeks earlier I had escorted my brother Brett and his wife from Phoenix Sky Harbor airport to the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, seeking a better diagnosis than the three-year death sentence he had just received from a physician in Washington. Unfortunately, Mayo Clinic could only confirm the initial diagnosis for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

In my brother’s case, the health care system functioned much better than did the family; it was the dastardly disease that required a cure, along with perhaps my own remnant hubris, but since his employer covered health care costs we were protected from most of the economic impact. I then immersed myself in life science while continuing the experiential learning curve in our tech incubator. It soon became apparent that solving related challenges in research would take considerably longer than the three years available to my brother, his wife, and their new son. Close observation of health care has since revealed that research was only part of the challenge. Read More

Preparing for the big data storm in mHealth


For some time now I have been thinking about structures, classifications, compression, security, scaling, and synthesis for the anticipated big data storm that will be created by mobile health. Even with a healthy dose of de-hyped skepticism, the mobile health data storm promises record high sustained winds, with much higher gusts. An extension of the Internet and Web, which is often compared to a global hydro network or an electric grid, mobility also contains dynamics more comparable to solar winds, complete we hope with personalized recipes that will positively impact human behavior, diagnostics, and therapies….. Read More